Considerate Couponing?


There is a new document out from the CIC, Coupon Information Corporation on Considerate Couponing with some guidelines. I would love to hear some opinions on this from others. Personally, I have some problems with it.

I really wonder how one can argue against buying coupons. What is the difference if I give someone a coupon for free verses giving it to them in exchange for other coupons or stamps or giving it to them for money? IE I think anyone who shares a coupon with another is breaking the no transferring rule, so what other rule is selling coupons necessarily breaking? (Now if you are getting the coupons illegally, by stealing newspapers or some such thing, then you are breaking the rules, but not by selling the coupons.)

I understand that selling coupons, exchanging coupons and maybe selling from your stockpile may go against what manufacturers intended, but I don’t think it is unethical or wrong in anyway.

I also wonder how in the world I see police blotter reports with it being stealing to take something from someone else’s recycling bin. Who are you stealing from the city? The recycling company who picks it up? I guess I won’t be grabbing any coupons from anyone else’s recycling bin, even though I know I will be tempted if I see them sitting there. Wonder if I rang the person’s doorbell, would they let me have them?

What is your opinion on this article? (Oh and the blog I read about the article on also had an article on gang cutting which shocked the heck out of me. They seemed to imply that if you stack your inserts and cut out multiples of one coupon at a time they may be denied by the manufacturer when the grocery store sends them in. Do you think this is at all true?)

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About skirnirh

I am a wife and mother of one who lives in San Jose, California. I enjoy couponing, walking/biking outside, financial matters, exercise, cooking and health news.
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2 Responses to Considerate Couponing?

  1. trishay79 says:

    I read the first article linked. I want to say I don’t think overage is that rare. I have purchased many overage items at Walmart including cover girl make up various kinds, schick shavers, johnson buddies bars and lots more at Walmart. Once Walmrat paid me $2 cash to walk out of the store with stuff. I guess overage isn’t that common but for me free stuff is pretty common as i read a lot of blogs and make shopping trips when I find more than 5 items free at once at a particular store.

    The nontransferability clause and buying/selling coupons thing. I always wondered what you were doing when you were buying a newspaper with coupons,or your neighbor gives you their coupons, etc. Isn’t that still transfering?

  2. I think that buying coupons may be encouraging the seller to do illegal things like stealing newspapers. I also had a customer who said that she bought a packet of coupons and they had the hole in it from being posted in a store. I found myself wondering if the seller had took a whole bunch or the whole packet off the store shelf to sell it. So, I wish people would try to only buy from seller that seem to collect them honestly. I think of it as like buying stuff that was stolen but the buyer didn’t know. It becomes a challenge for the buyer to figure this out. I don’t mind tranfering coupons as long as money isn’t involved. I think this increases the chance that the person didn’t steal the papers, take too many coupons from a store, be a cashier who stole the coupons after redeeming them,,, The last one came to my mind when I was looking at my stack of coupons that I had redeemed for that day. As for the second comment, I don’t see how a manufacturer could tell if a person cut a fist at a time. I wouldn’t put it past a store to cut coupons and claim to have redeemed them. The manufacturer may be trying to prevent this rather than a customer doing it. I thought of this one because I have seen a coupon near the register and wondered if it was a redeemed one or not.

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